Thursday, September 20, 2018

Funny Stuff: "Badger's Baby Brother--Beastley!" by Drake and Adams

Good evening, Groove-ophiles! Groovy (You Won't Believe What I've Dug Up This Time) Agent here with an eeeeaaarrrrly Neal Adams job for DC Comics on (in case you couldn't guess) Adventures of Bob Hope (#106, June 1967). This wild and wacky tale features the (almost) legendary Super-Hip, as well as a group of Universal Monsters parodies. Author Arnold Drake's story is over-the-top wacky, loaded with sight gags, pratfalls, and snappy patter. It's Adams' art that really steals the show--as usual. Prepare to meet Bob, Super-Hip, Dr. Van Pyre, Frank N. Stein, and most of all... "Badger's Baby Brother--Beastley!"

























5 comments:

  1. Neal Adams had an amazing journey in comics from the funny material to war stories then finally super-heroes, besides some horror tales as well.

    He was adept at all of these genres, & is still producing after all these years.

    Best regards,
    Chris A.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Neal Adams told me at a con he loved doing Bob Hope and Jerry Lewis. He said he could do 10 pages a day and it was the easiest assighment he ever had.

      Delete
    2. Neal Adams has been on a crazy rant for the past 15 years where he tries to convince young artists to TRACE photos. Great way to stiffen up your work & not learn. One has to know the fundamentals of figure drawing, perspective, light & shadow, etc. before using photo reference in a tastefully effective way. Many great artists like Am Williamson & Gray Morrow fell into the trap of using it too much.

      Frazetta, on the other hand, never let it dominate his work, but made photos a useful tool.

      I don't advocate tracing at all, but many commercial artists do it to save time.

      Regards,
      Chris A.

      Delete
  2. Any plans for scans from some groovy '70s fare published in Star Reach or Hot Stuf (the indie title, not the Harvey Comics imp)?

    Neal Adams did some work there, as well as Howard Chaykin & other comics notables.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I enjoyed Alex Toth's "The Vanguard" which was published on one of those two series back in the '70s.

      Delete

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