Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Decent Comics: "The Solomon Plague" by Michelinie and Redondo

Dig it, Groove-ophiles! David Michelinie's final Swamp Thing tale is a pretty cool one, continuing the sci-fi and horror mash-up-thing with a town full of nuclear radiated mutants! Artist Nestor Redondo is back doing his usual ghoulishly gorgeous art-thing, natch! From Swamp Thing #22 (January 1976), here's "The Solomon Plague!"
Cover art by Ernie Chan



















3 comments:

  1. A good story, and, how oddly and as if through a glass darkly ambulatory cadaver-ish, if you know what I mean, flavor-wise! Thanks, Groove!

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  2. A good story in the post Wein/Wrightson era of the Swamp Thing. It looks like Nestor Redindo was really hitting his stride delineating our muck monster.

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  3. One could have replaced Swampy with the incredible Hulk (or Tor Johnson!) in this story, and it would have still worked. Good Redondo art, but the panel count was a bit higher than usual on some pages. And, again, the series started with 24 story pages per issue. Here it was down to 18. A six page loss is a lot in terms of plot development. Michelinie's plot was very good, but the writing didn't crackle like it should have. It would be interesting to see one of today's top comic writers re-dialogue this issue; it could be a real powerhouse.

    I was VERY disappointed with the next two issues, however, and the cheesy logo that replaced the original one (by Gaspar Saladino). But then the series eneded at #24.

    Best regards,

    Chris A.

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